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5 Unbelievable Things You Never Knew About Fantasy Month Names

The way we name months is arbitrary. They’re frequently named for the number of days in them, or based on which Roman god was being worshipped at the time they were first used to keep track of year-long cycles.

But as it turns out, some countries have done things a little differently than others and this has had some interesting consequences – including affecting our lives in ways that you may not even be aware! Read on to find out how..

July wasn’t always July. For about 500 years before Julius Caesar took over Rome, the Romans had no fixed calendar system. Instead each month started with March (Martius) and continued through December (Decembris). When he finally introduced his new calendar system, Caesar named the months after deities in an effort to spread his own fame. But he had a problem with July – what Roman god was best associated with it?

He turned to Hercules and decided that, since this month is sometimes hot (julius) while other times cold (februarius), its perfect fit would be Jove’s son who excelled at both summer heat waves and winter snowstorms. And so there you have it: for November through April, we celebrate Julius Caesar; but from May until October, we thank him by celebrating all things Herculean!

– Janus used January as their start of new year because they adopted the Julian calendar first introduced by Julius Ceasar on 24th Oct 1582.

– April was named after the goddess of love because it is said that she helped Aphrodite, who had been wounded by a jealous rival during their war with the Titans – and incidentally, both are connected to Venus. It’s also said that this month corresponds to when plants start blooming again after winter. The first plant in bloom? The violet!

– June comes from Feriae Junae or ‘the altar days of Juno’, thanks to the Roman festival on 11th June which honored her marriage to Jupiter as well as Rome’s victory over its arch enemy Veii (Juno Regina). But did you know there used to be two separate festivals for different purposes? One celebrated Juno Lucina, Goddess of Childbirth, and the other celebrated Juno Sospita, Goddess of Women.

– January is named after Janus or Ianuarius (according to some sources), a Roman god who presided over doors and passages which are about to close up for winter – so that they could be opened again in springtime. As you have probably guessed by now, this month was dedicated not only to him but also to Juno Februa (or Febris) at certain times of year – while others honored Hora Quirinalis instead!

– April Fool’s Day carries with it an old tradition: people would deliberately tell lies on All Fools’ Day as tricks upon their friends until someone fell for them. This ancient custom may date back to the Roman festival of Hilaria on February 24, which celebrated laughter as a sign that winter was ending and the time for feasting is at hand.

– October 31st has been observed by various cultures with some form of Halloween celebrations since ancient times – whether it’s Celtic tradition or Samhain customs in Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales; or observances such as All Saints’ Eve (La Víspera de Todos los Santos) in Mexico!

– December 25th? It wasn’t always called Christmas Day. In fact, this day used to be called Yule before Christianity came around. Some have speculated that its origins might lie not just in paganism but also in ancient Rome where people would burn lights to help drive away the winter and welcome back longer days.

– It’s not just cultures around the world that have their own version of this holiday season. There are some people who don’t celebrate Christmas at all, like Buddhists in Thailand or Jews in Iran. But one thing they might share with everyone else is feelings about what an exciting time it is! Whether you’re Jewish, Buddhist or Christian – or simply not religious at all – there’s still plenty for you to enjoy: a sense of family togetherness; laughing until your belly hurts; enjoying delicious food and drink.. And if it’s white outside? That means snow too!

The history of October 31st goes beyond its origins as All Hallows’ Eve, and is tied to the Celtic belief system.

It’s not just cultures around the world that have their own version of this holiday season. There are some people who don’t celebrate Christmas at all, like Buddhists in Thailand or Jews in Iran. But one thing they might share with everyone else is feelings about what an exciting time it is! Whether you’re Jewish, Buddhist or Christian – or simply not religious at all – there’s still plenty for you to enjoy: a sense of family togetherness; laughing until your belly hurts; enjoying delicious food and drink.. And if it’s white outside? That means snow too!

The history of October 31st goes beyond its origins as All Hallows’ Eve, and is tied to the Celtic belief system. It’s not just cultures around the world that have their own version of this holiday season. There are some people who don’t celebrate Christmas at all, like Buddhists in Thailand or Jews in Iran. But one thing they might share with everyone else is feelings about what an exciting time it is! Whether you’re Jewish, Buddhist or Christian – or simply not religious at all – there’s still plenty for you to enjoy: a sense of family togetherness; laughing until your belly hurts; enjoying delicious food and drink.. And if it’s white outside? That means snow too!

This year we’ll be welcoming October 31st as All Hallows’ Eve again after so many years under its other name, Halloween. It’s a time for ghosts and goblins, monstrous masks carved from pumpkins by candlelight; it’s also the day before All Saints’ Day (November first), which is traditionally observed as a memorial to all of humanity that has died!

The date October 31st was chosen because in ancient times people believed the barrier between our world and “the other side” thinned on this night – allowing spirits and witches to roam free among us humans. That made sense at least when life expectancy wasn’t so long- there were usually more deaths than births every year! But we’ve been celebrating an early November eve since Pope Gregory XII changed it in 1582 to anchor Holy Days firmly with church feast days.

So, ween is actually a day full of strangely appropriate Christian symbolism. And Halloween itself has much deeper roots than just a bunch of kids dressing up for the night! On this eve in Pre-Columbian times – Celtic people would celebrate Samhain; while older still – our ancestors celebrated their New Year at the end of October when days were getting shorter. They believed that supernatural beings roamed about with more power during these months and they wanted to keep them appeased by leaving offerings on altars or putting out food so they wouldn’t harm humans as often!

I hope you enjoyed my post today about what it takes to have an unforgettable All Hallows’ Eve celebration! If not, then here’s some really great Fantasy month names is a term for all the months in one year that have 31 days. Most years will only have 11 of these, but occasionally others are thrown into the mix and cause some confusion over when to celebrate Halloween or New Year’s Day. It turns out there’s something really strange about those bizarre-sounding words: they’re real! We can thank ancient Roman Catholic saints for designing them as part of their calendar reform efforts before Pope Gregory XII made his changes in 1582. The most important thing you need to know is how your life has been affected by this weird little quirk—here are five ways fantasy month names changed our lives (and maybe even yours). And if not, get ready because

By Radhe Gupta

Radhe Gupta is an Indian business blogger. He believes that Content and Social Media Marketing are the strongest forms of marketing nowadays. Radhe also tries different gadgets every now and then to give their reviews online. You can connect with him...

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