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Why does the post-medieval skull in the video have such bad teeth?

The answer to why the post-medieval skull in this video has such bad teeth is tooth demineralization. Tooth demineralization is a condition in which minerals are lost from the enamel and dentine of your teeth, causing them to weaken and become more susceptible to decay. There are several different causes for tooth demineralization that we will go into later on, but if you want to know how it can be reversed then keep reading!

Now let’s talk about why this post-medieval skull has such bad teeth–the answer is because he had gum disease. Gum disease or periodontitis is an infection caused by bacteria that destroy tissues surrounding the tooth roots. This bacteria slowly builds up around the root until eventually destroying any bone structure leading up to it as well. The result? Badly stained gums due to all the bacteria and plaque that’s built up, tooth decay as well as loose teeth.

So what causes gum disease? There are a few different factors but they boil down to two main culprits: not brushing your teeth properly or at least twice a day, along with poor hygiene in general which usually includes smoking. Smoking has been shown to increase inflammation around the gums leading to periodontitis while also slowing healing time for wounds (especially those related to bad oral health). But there is good news! The most common type of treatment for gum disease is called scaling and root planing–this helps remove tartar from the surface of your teeth. This process will make sure you have healthy levels of minerals on your enamel again so it won’t demineralize again.

why does the post-medieval skull in the video have such bad teeth?

Post-Medieval people would likely not be following proper dental hygiene which you could argue is one of the main causes for tooth decay as well as loose teeth. So what are some other contributing factors to gum disease? Smoking has been shown to increase inflammation around the gums leading to periodontitis while also slowing healing time for wounds (especially those related to bad oral health). But there’s good news! Scaling and root planning this help remove tartar from the surface of your teeth, making sure that healthy levels of minerals on enamel will not be depleted or lost again.

How do you stop tooth demineralization?

The best way to combat tooth demineralization is by brushing and flossing regularly (but not too forcefully).

What causes demineralization?

Erosion from acids in the mouth, bacterial plaque on teeth or food particles left behind after eating is all potential factors. But also relevant is what’s going on within your body such as a lack of minerals like calcium, magnesium, potassium, or vitamin D. This can be caused by an unhealthy diet that doesn’t have enough protein or vitamins and has too many refined carbs such as white bread and pasta which leach out these minerals from our bodies more quickly than whole grains do. You can also reverse the effects of demineralizatioN by consuming more calcium and vitamin D.

Teeth are coated with a thin layer of a hard material called enamel, which protects the tooth from infection and decay. The outer part of this coating is made up largely of minerals such as calcium and phosphate, while underneath there’s a softer substance known as dentine that helps to protect your teeth against wear and tear. But our mouths contain corrosive compounds like plaque acids that can dissolve these crucial minerals. The presence of bacteria in the mouth also contributes because they produce acid when digesting food particles left behind after eating or sugar crystals on dental surfaces – all enzymes present in saliva also contribute. As well as demineralization caused by diet, medical conditions can lead to poor oral health too.

It’s important to address tooth demineralization as soon as you notice symptoms such as a painful or sensitive tooth, bleeding gums, and teeth that are losing their shape because the bacteria will continue to attack your teeth – this is why it’s crucial for individuals with severe tooth pain to see a dentist immediately rather than waiting until they have an emergency situation on their hands. The best way of preventing dental problems in the long term is by taking care of our oral hygiene habits, including brushing twice daily using fluoride toothpaste at least five minutes per session (and not forgetting about flossing). Drinking water throughout the day can also help reduce plaque acids and if you’re pregnant make sure you take prenatal vitamins which contain calcium.

By Devesh Rai

Pop culture maven. Unapologetic travel trailblazer. Tv evangelist. Wannabe reader. Avid food expert. Bacon fan.

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